The Magic of Double-Whammy Headlines: And How To Use Their Enormous Power

Pulling the Rabbit out of the Hat

Laurel and Hardy

Batman and Robin

Superman

Which is the odd one one out?

Yup, it’s the guy who can’t handle Kryptonite, of course. If Superman is in trouble, there’s almost no one to rescue him. But Hardy or Batman can get in trouble all they want, and they have a nice partner to back them up.

The same applies to the double-whammy headline.

A double whammy headline is a headline with two partners. And like most partnerships, one partner takes on a slightly bigger role. So let’s take some examples:

Why every small business needs sales analysis: and how to complete it in 20 minutes

Why quarterly analysis can increase business by 50%: the three key steps

The Rumiddha Method: 4 steps to achieve a profitable forum online

The Keyboard Wheel (and how it helps you decide the right color for your website)

Why small businesses don’t grow—and how to use autoresponders to increase business by 27% every year

The first part in some of these headlines could almost stand alone.

Why every small business needs sales analysis

Why quarterly analysis can increase business by 50%

The Rumiddha Method

The Keyboard Wheel

Why small businesses don’t grow

And yes, some of them really are complete by themselves.

Technically, that’s the goal. To write one part so well, that the first part is already a complete headline.

Yes, all by itself.

It could steal the show without having the add-on.

But what if the first part is not that complete?

In the examples above, the “Rumiddha Method” and “Keyboard Wheel” tell you nothing. But they pull you in. Their job is not to be complete. It’s to sucker you in while the second half of the headline knocks you out!

And that’s how the double-whammy headline works.

It uses double the power to get your attention. And once it’s gotten your attention, you can’t help but want to click to read the rest of the article. And of course, you can use colons, question marks, brackets or the em dash— a whole lot of punctuation marks to create these double-whammy headlines.

But should you use double-whammy headlines all the time?

Should you take your umbrella out all the time? Of course not. You can write a headline like this:

Why the most attractive headline may not result in the greatest conversion

And that headline, despite not being double-whammy, works perfectly well. But from time to time you want to mix up your headlines with a bit of power as well. And that’s when double-whammy headlines are perfect.

But they can also be too, um, overdone.

You can try so hard to stuff your headline with terms that it may be impossible to work out what you’re saying. So yes, double-whammy headlines can be too whammy, and end up being clammy.

Why focusing on advanced placement guarantees career failure (and how to avoid that fate while still getting great grades)

You may scrunch up your eyebrows in confusion, but it’s common to see writers getting eager and overdoing the double-whammy headline so that it becomes kinda hard to understand. Keeping the headline simple is critical to getting the idea across effectively.

Ok, time to summarize:

Want to see the examples with punctuation marks again? Here you go…

Why every small business needs sales analysis: and how to complete it in 20 minutes

Why quarterly analysis can increase business by 50%: the three key steps

The Rumiddha Method: 4 steps to achieve a profitable forum online

The Keyboard Wheel (and how it helps you decide the right color for your website)

Why small businesses don’t grow—and how to use autoresponders to increase business by 27% every year

Use double-whammy headlines often when getting the attention of your audience.

Because duos work well.
Like TweedleDee and Tweedledum!

 

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About the author

Sean D'Souza

Sean D'Souza is a writer, marketing guru and expert on sales psychology. Read more by Sean on Psychotactics.com

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