How to Write Killer Articles With Planned Disconnectors

Imagine you were reading a mystery novel. You’ve just finished five pages. The story line is becoming really interesting.

And then you turn the page
And find the sixth page has been torn out. Now that’s really irritating, eh?

But let’s suppose you decide to continue reading anyway
And you move to page seven, and pick up the thread of the story. And you’re reading page eight, page nine, page ten. And page eleven is torn out. At this point, you’re more than frustrated. And this is the feeling that many readers have when they read your article. It’s because you’re not planning your disconnectors.

So what are disconnectors?
Disconnectors can be simply described as a sudden stop.
 So let’s say you’re telling a story.
Or telling a joke.
Or singing a song.
A sudden stop in the middle of your story/joke/song would be a disconnector. But a disconnector isn’t a bad thing, provided you understand the difference between a planned and an unplanned disconnector.
1) Planned Disconnectors.
2) Un-planned disconnectors.

Planned Disconnectors
Planned Disconnectors are what you see on any TV serial. You’re watching this villain chasing the hero. The tension builds up. And it reaches a crescendo. And the scene changes to something else. Like a scene at the beach. What you’ve just experienced is a disconnection. One moment you’re watching a crazy chase. Next moment the waves are lapping on the sand. And this experience is a planned disconnector.

But how do we know it’s a planned disconnector?
Because the villain and the hero will show up again in the same serial. Which means the thread of the serial is to disconnect, then connect, then disconnect. And this planned disconnector allows us to pick up the thread of the serial.

But what about unplanned disconnectors?

Unplanned disconnectors are simply a factor of too many thoughts. Imagine that same villain chasing the hero. And you don’t see the scene again. The scene doesn’t re-connect at all. So you’re left with half a story.

And that’s frustrating
Because the reason you were reading the story, was because you were interested. If the story suddenly ‘disappears’, you’ve created a disconnect. The reader may tolerate the disconnect, as long as you bring up the connection later in the article.

So let’s see an example:
Peter worked for few years as a volunteer in a little village in Peru. He really enjoyed his work and felt he was doing something useful. Eventually he moved back to his own country, and got a job. 35 years later, his professional life came to an end, as he had reached the mandatory 62 years retirement age.

His volunteer Peruvian years came back nagging him more and more. What happened to the people he had lived with 35 years earlier? What became of the village? In the case of Peter, his time was filled with questions about the people and the village in Peru. It was difficult for him to focus on other activities. He
eventually went to Peru.

Martha felt that retirement age came to early. She still had things she wanted to do professionally. She resented seeing her years of professional experience as a bank manager almost being cancelled by the fact she reached retirement age. 

She felt drained of all her energy. She felt tired right in the morning when she woke up.

See what happened in the story above?

You got into the story of Peter and Peru. But the story suddenly disconnected. And went on to Martha. Now as you read further, you’d expect the writer to bring back the connection. To complete the Peter in Peru story, as it were.

But most article-writers never bring back the connection

They’re so eager to move to the next idea, that they fail to
complete the first. They’re onto the next idea. The next paragraph. The next piece of information. And the reader is now totally confused. But reads on any way.

But isn’t that the point of the article?: To get the reader to read on anyway?
Yes, it is. As we’ve found, disconnectors provide an intense lift in drama. Or a drop in drama. But if the reader continues to find disconnects, and there’s no connection, the reader feels cheated. They feel like they’ve read to page five. And then page six is gone.

And then continued to page ten. And page eleven is gone.
This unplanned disconnect leaves an incomplete, icky feeling.

And it’s not what you set out to do
So either complete your story in the greatest detail (No, you don’t have to create disconnectors at all). But if you disconnect—disconnect deliberately! Or not at all.

RECENT POSTS

How to Build a Summer Writing Routine in 4 Simple Steps

When the weather turns warmer and the days get longer, many of us start to daydream about the possibility of making serious progress on our writing projects. Whether you have some time away from work or study, or simply make use of the extra daylight to extend your...

Is It Too Late to Start Writing?

Perhaps you’ve always wanted to be a writer but haven’t made it happen yet.  There are so many reasons why you might not have made the leap from aspiring to write to actually starting to do it yet. Maybe you doubt whether you’re good enough. Maybe writing has...

Why Is Writing So Hard? (And What to Do About It)

Do you ever find yourself asking why is writing so hard? When people picture the working process of a writer, they often picture a carefree, fun, and creative situation.  Perhaps that's how you imagined being a writer would be. Often, our earliest experiences...

Rising Action in a Story (Or, Why Your WIP Might Suck)

Have you ever told somebody that you started a book but you just couldn't get into it? Have you ever picked up a book and struggled through the first page, the first chapter, even the first half, only to stop reading entirely? You may even have a bookshelf dedicated...

JOIN OVER 2 MILLION READERS

WANT YOUR NEXT BOOK TO BE A BESTSELLER?

Then you need KDP Rocket – the killer advantage of pro authors.

Related Posts

How to Build a Summer Writing Routine in 4 Simple Steps

How to Build a Summer Writing Routine in 4 Simple Steps

When the weather turns warmer and the days get longer, many of us start to daydream about the possibility of making serious progress on our writing projects. Whether you have some time away from work or study, or simply make use of the extra daylight to extend your...

How to Get Ideas for Writing (15 Simple Tips)

How to Get Ideas for Writing (15 Simple Tips)

Do you want to learn how to find topics to write about? Do you ever sit down to write a blog post, article or chapter,  and nothing, but nothing appears in your mind? This is the dreaded writer's block. The good news is that if you use the following 15 tips, you...

About The Author

Sean D'Souza

Sean D'Souza is a writer, marketing guru and expert on sales psychology. Read more by Sean on Psychotactics.com

Latest Posts

Is It Too Late to Start Writing?

Is It Too Late to Start Writing?

Perhaps you’ve always wanted to be a writer but haven’t made it happen yet.  There are so many reasons why you might not have made the leap from aspiring to write to actually starting to do it yet. Maybe you doubt whether you’re good enough. Maybe writing has...

Why Is Writing So Hard? (And What to Do About It)

Why Is Writing So Hard? (And What to Do About It)

Do you ever find yourself asking why is writing so hard? When people picture the working process of a writer, they often picture a carefree, fun, and creative situation.  Perhaps that's how you imagined being a writer would be. Often, our earliest experiences...

What Is the Climax of a Story?

What Is the Climax of a Story?

Have you ever noticed that once you get about three-quarters into a book, you have to finish it?  That’s because you’ve likely run into the climax. And when the climax of a book is good, it becomes impossible to put down. Learning to write a compelling climax...

28 Figure Of Speech Examples

28 Figure Of Speech Examples

Storytelling is a different kind of writing. Often, voice trumps grammar. Of course, your writing needs to be easily understood by the reader, but it’s crucial that the voice of your writing is strong.  Whether you write fiction or nonfiction, both genres employ...

How to Get Ideas for Writing (15 Simple Tips)

How to Get Ideas for Writing (15 Simple Tips)

Do you want to learn how to find topics to write about? Do you ever sit down to write a blog post, article or chapter,  and nothing, but nothing appears in your mind? This is the dreaded writer's block. The good news is that if you use the following 15 tips, you...

>