No Time, No Money, No Motivation to Write? Here’s What to Do

    Why aren’t you writing?

    I’ll bet you have a host of reasons lined up. You’re ill, you’re busy, your writing stinks, your house is a mess, your kids are a pain, and you don’t have any time, money, or motivation.

    Writing is important to you—but it’s also scary. I get that!

    You risk embarrassment, failure and the scorn of your friends and family. These reasons for not even trying are handy because they keep you safe from these horrible feelings and experiences.

    So now you’re safe in your little box, never risking failure and humiliation… because you never tried going after your dreams.

    Is that what you really want?
    I don’t think so.

    So let’s bust the five most common excuses for not writing:

    Excuse #1: My writing stinks!

    Let me start by saying that if you think your writing stinks, it probably doesn’t.

    I know a lot of writing teachers, and we all agree on one thing: Great writers tend to have low self-esteem when it comes to their work, while writers who think they’re wonderful are the ones who need major editing.

    Most of my career has been in magazine journalism, and some of my first pitches were embarrassing — like the time I sent a query letter to Family Circle for an article called “Quik Dri Cheez: Why Advertisers Can’t Spell.” (*cringe*) But I kept pitching, learning from every rejection and every editor comment, and within a couple of years, I was writing for top magazines.

    Still think your lack of skill will keep you from success as a writer? Then learn to write better! Try these tactics to improve:

    • Get a grip on grammar. If you have issues with grammar and style, they are easy enough to correct. The Elements of Style is available free online and will help you learn to write in a simple, effective style that works for most magazines. I also like Grammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips.
    • Read up. If you aren’t one already, become a voracious reader of everything, from literary fiction to industry trade magazines. You’ll start to recognize what makes good writing, and will absorb the basics of grammar, style, tone and cadence.
    • Get help. If you feel you need more help than you can get from a book—or if you write and write but still feel that your writing needs work—you can hire a coach to help you with your writing, or an editor to go over your work.
    • Write anyway. They say experience is the best teacher, and they (whoever they are) are right. When I first started getting assignments — mostly for trade magazines — I would print out the article and go over the draft multiple times with a red pen. Now I can write and edit an article on the screen, and my editors are happy with my work. You’ll experience the same growth in your abilities and confidence if you just keep pitching and writing.

    Don’t let the (probably untrue) thought that you’re not good enough keep you from writing. If you truly do need to improve, you can.

    Excuse #2: You need to have a trust fund to be a writer.

    I occasionally see nasty forum posts telling aspiring writers that if they don’t have a rich spouse to support them, they can forget about their writing dreams. It’s a common misconception that writing is a career or hobby fit only for moneyed ladies and men of leisure.

    That’s a big, gross lie. Having been in the business for two decades, I know many, many writers who make a good living from their writing, with some of them being the only breadwinners in their families.

    Then, there’s the fear that going after your writing passion requires a separate office, fancy equipment, an expensive website, professionally designed business cards, and a contingent of coaches, accountants and lawyers.

    The happy reality is that you can get started as a writer for close to nothing. For example:

    • A few weeks ago I built a website for my new book from scratch in under four hours—for free.
    • You can score free business cards if you don’t mind a small ad on the back.
    • Some professionals are happy to barter their services for your writing. I’ve bartered for web design, ad placement, and more.
    • No need to spring for fancy software when you can find free word processors online, use Google Spreadsheets for tracking assignments, try no-cost online scheduling systems to set up your calls, offer teleseminars using FreeConferencePro.com, and more.
    • Lots of services offer free trials up to a certain threshold. For example, if you want to start a mailing list for your blog, MailChimp is free for up to 2,000 subscribers.

    You get the idea. No cash? No worries. All you need to start writing is creativity and great ideas.

    Excuse #3: I’m a busy person! Who has time for writing?

    You do.

    It may feel like you have zero spare minutes in your day; you’re working 80 hours per week, and you don’t even have enough time to sleep.

    However, time-use studies show that we work less, do less housework and childcare, and sleep more than we think. We don’t exaggerate on purpose, but in a culture where it’s a badge of honor to be overworked and underslept, it’s natural for us to over-report work hours and under-report sleep hours.

    So let’s say you work 50 hours per week at your day job, sleep 8 hours per night, and do 20 hours of housework and childcare per week (which is a stretch for many of us). Even that busy schedule leaves 42 hours free for other things. That’s enough for a second full-time job! (Maybe a writing job?)

    The problem is, those free hours are scattered in bits and pieces throughout the week, so it feels like we never have a good, solid chunk of time to do our writing.

    The secret is to take a hard look at your schedule and figure out where you can move things around to create more continuous blocks of time. For example:

    • Batch them up. Can you batch errands, phone calls, email checking and so on to get them all done at once?
    • Be picky. When scheduling an appointment, don’t take the first slot offered if it’s not good for your schedule. You may have to wait longer if you’re picky about the time slot, but it’s worth it if it helps you arrange your time in a more efficient way.
    • Save your day. If you work at home, stop scheduling things for the middle of the day just because you can. For instance, I used to have a private yoga session every week at 10 am. I realized these sessions were breaking up my day in a bad way, so I rescheduled them for right after I knock off work for the day.
    • Schedule your writing. Instead of telling yourself you’ll write when you have the time—which somehow never happens—schedule writing time into your calendar just like any other important appointment. That way, you’ll schedule tasks that crop up around your writing time, instead of letting them suck up your whole day.

    If you examine your schedule, change what’s not working for you, and set boundaries around your time… you’ll find you have plenty of time to write.

    Excuse #4: I want to write, but when I’m ready to get to work, I’m so not motivated!

    You’re passionate about writing. You’re driven to write. But when it comes time to sit down and actually, you know, write… suddenly, your motivation is at an all-time low. In fact, your body and mind are actually screaming at you to not write.

    In his book The War of Art, Stephen Pressfield calls this problem “Resistance,” and says it tends to rear its head when you’re about to do something creative, launch a business, or attempt to advance spiritually or morally. Writing can fit into all of these categories. It’s a trifecta of Resistance!

    I’ve found that many writers, at this point, plop down on the sofa and attempt to psychoanalyze themselves. “Why can’t I write? What am I afraid of? What’s the problem here?”

    But the fact is, you can’t think your way into motivation.

    What you need to do push past the fear and lack of inspiration just long enough to take action. Once you’re in action mode, your motivation builds, you get on a roll, and you want to keep going.

    Here are a few tricks that can help you break through the initial fear and resistance, and start writing:

    • Take five. Set a timer for five minutes and tell yourself that you need to write only until the timer goes off, and then you can stop.
    • Negotiate with yourself. Make a deal with yourself that you need to write only the title of your new work and your byline. (I do this when I have a magazine article assignment I really, really don’t want to start.)
    • Start in the middle. For example, instead of starting a blog post with the lead sentence, start with the tips and then write your beginning later. Write a middle chapter of your novel instead of the first chapter. If you’re working on an article, start with the kicker (ending) instead of the lede (beginning).

    Chances are, once you start getting words on paper, you’ll be on fire to keep going.

    Excuse #5: I’ll write when the kids are grown/I take just one more writing class/my health improves etc.

    We tend to put off what’s most important to us until the Universe aligns all the events in our lives exactly in our favor.

    But it never happens. We always need more money, we cure one illness only to come down with another one, the kids move out but then you need to wait until you’re over the “empty nest” syndrome. The list of requirements never ends!

    “I’ll write when X happens” is a handy excuse that keeps us from ever having to take action, so we’re never at risk of embarrassment or failure. It keeps you nice and safe from these scourges—but it also prevents you from living your dreams.

    Don’t wait. Instead of requiring that every aspect of your life in perfect form and order, take action now — in your messy, imperfect, beautiful life. Write!

    The fact is: there are innumerable reasons (excuses?) not to write.

    And one overwhelming reason to write—because you want to.

    How do you find the time and motivation to write? Tell us in the comments!

    If you liked this post, please share it on social media.

    About the author

      Linda Formichelli

      Linda Formichelli is the author of The Renegade WriterShe has written for more than 130 magazines and is the co-author of The Renegade Writer: A Totally Unconventional Guide to Freelance Writing Success. She is also the author ofHow to Do It All: The Revolutionary Plan to Create a Full, Meaningful Life - While Only Occasionally Wanting to Poke Your Eyes Out With a Sharpie.

    • newaccount says:

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    • newaccount says:

      very good one took it as like we are

    • Puisi says:

      Maybe u need some rest, eat, and family.
      Get up bro…!!

    • apk says:

      I really love to read such a nice article. Thanks!Keep rocking.

    • svr says:

      Feeling good by reading your excellent motivative article. thank you

    • James says:

      Writing is a very good habit. Sometimes we think that we are not good writer or we cant write like others. but according to me you are fully wrong at this point. I believe one should try to write. when we write we get to know the real faults or mistakes we are committing while our writing we can improve it day by day.

    • Alina says:

      Writing makes us understand what we have learnt till date in our life. It allows us to help others in their learning. I think it is a type of social work. Good article.

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    • Hi Linda. Great Post! I have time, but No Money, no motivation to Write really. Thanks for sharing

    • Jinu says:

      Writing is one of the skill and this is so important for us
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    • love this information, love your effort you put in to this.

    • Estoy feliz de encontrar este post muy útil para mí, ya que contiene gran cantidad de información

      • Thanks for sharing these useful information! Hope that you will continue doing nice post like this. The contents are very good and very informative.

    • hahahah its amazing love these pics

    • Job says:

      I have time, but No Money, no motivation to Write really great article. thanks to share with us.

    • Estoy feliz de encontrar este post muy útil para mí, ya que contiene gran cantidad de información.

    • Miri Steve says:

      You have created a nice blog, its ironical that you are a blog writer writing on ‘no motivation to write.’ Thank you for taking time to share.

    • I have time, but No Money, no motivation to Write

    • emoji says:

      I love how you still write and share about your day and experiences! You feel like such a real, nice, and humble person because of this!

    • Ethan says:

      It bothers me when people say that discipline is better than motivation, or that inspiration is a lie or things like that, because it’s not true. The problem I have with this sentiment is that you can’t do your work on discipline alone. Sure, only having motivation won’t get you anywhere, but you can’t ever build your discipline unless it’s for something that you actually want to do, and discipline can’t make you want things. Sure, inspiration is fickle, but discipline can’t tell you why you should work in the first place. You need motivation for that. Don’t throw out one tool in favor of another. Use both.

    • My motivation is dying. Thank you for the article. I guess I will find some spare time to write, not for money, for my ambition 🙂

    • Inspirational blog. Loved third points of explanations which is related to me. 🙂 .

    • Great advice as always, Linda. I love the suggestion of starting in the middle ✏ or wherever you feel you can blast through resistance the fastest. Like I’m supposed to be working on a short story ? for a magazine contest, and here I am commenting on a blog post! ? At least I got my fingers warmed up. ?

      Keep up the good work! ?

      • Thanks very much! And of COURSE this post comment is a warm-up for the contest. 🙂 Good luck with the contest!

    • The excuse of kids is one that most people give for not writing. I do accept that I am one of those people. BTW the image you use in the article is interesting.

    • Libby says:

      My problem is that once I have mulled over an idea – I belong to an amateur writers group that meets fortnightly and set ourselves ‘homework to be completed (usually) within that time – I set off well, and then flag. part way through. At the moment we have set ourselves a short story within Tales of the Unexpected format, and, whilst I have been able to forge ahead with the beginning and end, even researching historical events and constructing a family tree so that I understand the relationships between the characters, both present and past, I am finding really difficult to construct a believable ending; I have the basic idea in my head but cannot seem to transfer it to paper.

    • you have chosen exact points which happen to us every day and we ignore somewhere our creativity. Useful explanation & motivational points.

    • well said, i completely agree with the excuse of kids, i often do that. i need to concentrate and work focused. thanks for the tips

    • Hi. I’m new to this website and new to writing my first book. I’m in the process of writing my memoirs. All my best ideas come when I’m ready to sleep. As soon as I get up to write something I go blank. I’m obsessing on the beginning and can’t seem to break this obsession. I have OCD. So I have the attention span of a squirrel. It’s so frustrating. I don’t feel motivated and everything I write I’m unhappy with. I would love to find or start a writers group in San Diego. I need my passion back. Thanks Hayley. PS. My memoirs are about the abuse I suffered as a child. The addictions that I dove into to cope. And how I survived it all without ending up going completely insane.

      • Hayley, many writers keep a notebook by the bed because we ALL tend to get brilliant ideas when we’re falling asleep or in the middle of the night. I’ve even heard of writers who buy waterproof notebooks and pens, or keep erasable markers in the shower, because that’s another place ideas tend to strike. Not to mention a notebook in the car, or you can record ideas on your phone using the voice recorder too!

        I hope you have success with your memoir. You’re not alone…many, many writers have ADD (me included). Good luck!

      • Wow, I wrote you a long reply and it got eaten by the Internet gods! I wanted to let you know we ALL tend to get ideas when falling asleep, in the shower, or in the car. That’s why many writers keep notebooks EVERYWHERE. For the shower there are even waterproof notebooks and pens, or you can keep an erasable marker in there and write on the walls. (Just test this in an inconspicuous spot first!)

        You’re not alone…many, many writers have ADD (me included). Good luck with your memoir…I hope you have success!

    • Thanks for sharing your experience with us it helps many people to survive and enjoy in college life.

    • If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”

    • Josephine says:

      A lot of what you say is true, I have just started my own website https://keepcalmandaskme.com it is a relationship advice blog mainly dealing sociopathic people. I try and write at least two articles a week which is hard going as I work full time. However I am committed to continuing on with it and even on evenings where I get home and want to plop on the couch I make myself get up and write even if it is a few paragraphs.

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    • Keith says:

      Hi Lynda,
      I think you nailed it when you said that you’ll write if you really want to. It’s a very daunting process at the start, especially with so much conflicting advice out there. Thanks for taking the time to clear some of the issues up. Really helpful.

    • Idellah says:

      Thank you for this platinum post. Gold isn’t good enough! I admit as a single woman with no other real financial support except little old me, Excuses #2 and #4 have had me hung up on keeping a regular writing schedule for some time now.

      Your post helps me see that it really much more about perception than what’s actually happening. I am at point in life where I just either need to put up or shut up and just flat out go for it. I use public transportation for my 2 hour a day commute back and forth to my 40 hours a week job.

      Great time to put in some headphones and ‘mood music’ and write, outline, etc. I have smartphone with Internet access so I use it to put ideas for posts, scenes and inspirations into Evernote and on Trello. To save my eyes from typing on a tiny little cell phone screen, find handwriting things on a legal or steno pad helps me feel more ‘connected’ to what I’m writing…or I can use my netbook or iPad…

      Thanks again for this post! Priceless. Sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees!

    • amber camm says:

      when im bored ill pick a pen and paper up

    • Hi Linda, This is a great post, and just what I needed to get off my —m and start writing again. I am scared of failure, and being rejected.
      I am determined to start writing again and I will, but every now and again I get into a depressive mood, and I don’t want to do anything.
      But your article has inspired me thank you.
      Veronica.

    • Great post, Linda. Like Christy Kelly commented, “Must be the moon phase,” because I too had just published this post on my website: http://www.sullivanwrites.com/ass-bed-earlier-time-passion/. We must always keep on top of our passion, otherwise, excuses will smother that desire. Thanks for reminding us to keep moving forward, Linda.

    • Fabulous post! I had just written a post on motivating oneself when I saw yours. http://buildingabrandonline.com/Freedomwriter/online-entrepreneur-motivational-first-aid/.
      Must be the moon phase! Thanks for the inspiration!

    • Thank you so much for this writeup.

      During my 20s, I worked most of the time, postponing writing and thinking when i get married and expecting my baby i will have a lot more time to write. During pregnancy i was so tired, and the last few months i couldn’t even sit steal for even an hour or read. I thought to my self, when my twins arrive and are still new born, i will make out time. It never happened. Today they’re 2yrs old (Almost 3) and i totally go by their time and can’t get to do anything for my self. Once everything is done most times, i’m already so tired. The few times i manage to grab my laptop, sleep takes hold of me.

      But i’m very glad i’m managed to write the first draft of my first novel. I’m hoping to edit it soon. I hope i find the time.

      This writeup has really motivated and encouraged me to find time

    • Patricia Brown says:

      What a timely article! I have used each excuse at one time or another and have tried some of the tips recommended. I am so ready to change my writing behavior and become the writer clamoring to emerge. Today, I am making an effort to be fully committed to my dreams and to step out of my own way with a refreshingly new start.

      Thank you so much for creating an inspirational blog for writers and would-be-writers at every stage in the development process!

    • Some really great tips particularly about procrastination which has been affecting me recently – love the five minute timer tip. I will definitely give it a go.

    • Zada says:

      Fear and resistance is a big issue for me . so i tell my self to write only 300 word per day. but when i start, all fear and resistance do not interrupt…..so i tell to myself to write just my name and adress…..start is hard..

    • Hey thanks Linda!
      This may have just inspired everyone to get back and think that everyone can write even they don’t have time. Thank you for your excellent tips and amazing message.

    • Deane A. Nutter says:

      Hey thanks Linda!
      This may have just inspired me to get back on the “bike” again and keep riding, or “writing” : ) Haha. Thank you for your excellent tips and amazing message. I guess I need to stop making excuses and get to work!

    • Linda H says:

      This is timely for me, Linda. I’m at a point where I’ve no money, on the verge of collapse, and sometimes fear marketing of my writing and sometimes, just writing. I’ve got commitments this afternoon, but after I will get more sleep (really often work til 4 a.m and get up at 8;30 a.m.) and begin on my new blog post.

      I did call an HR Manager to ask for an interview and got a callback to send an email and someone in HR will direct me to the right person. I’ll jump on that tonight too. I have a blog post in mind for that and could turn it into an article if I get motivated properly.

      Instead of finding excuses, I’ll face the fear and step forward. Then I may find that the gold mine will open and I’ll find new writing experiences. I’m guilty of #2 and #4 mostly, and of letting fear block my progress. Time to get my butt in gear and start writing. I know there are people out there that want to read what I write, it’s just a matter of doing it.

      Thanks for posting Linda. As always, you motivate and inspire me.

    • Laura says:

      I found your point that you can’t think your way into motivation very helpful. I often fall into this trap and try to think my way through lack of motivation. I think you are right however, and often the motivation comes once you start taking action. The trick is to get over the initial hurdle and take action when you don’t feel motivated!

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Thank you! I know, I feel the same way sometimes, especially on “down days.” The timer trick really helps.

    • Loretta says:

      Thank you for taking the time out to inspire writers. I’ve just finished a lengthy project and am zoning out and hoping to get back into the daily writing routine. I’ve found that the characters keep me focused and interested in the book’s progress. Thanks again. When you’ve got the solution to writing an article on becoming a best seller, I’d love to zone back in.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Let me make one of my books a bestseller, THEN I’ll have some advice! 🙂 Glad you liked the post and congrats on your finished project!

    • Diane Ziff says:

      I was quite taken with your blog – so many good ideas. I just have to apply them. Thanks for sharing.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Thanks! Please circle back and let us know how it goes!

    • Vibhay says:

      Thanks Linda,

      I’m from India and trust me I have almost 80% of the excuses you have listed above to stop me from writing. But I certainly feel charged up after reading this and I hope I will break the shackles soon and come up with few blog posts in a week. Your writing tips will come handy too.
      Thanks again!

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        I’m glad you found the post inspiring!

    • Mike says:

      Hello Linda,

      I always enjoy reading blog posts that are full of good tips for motivating writing. Believing in yourself is key along with the other good tips. Writing and reading voraciously will inevitably improve your writing. I would add that listening to podcasts on writing (ex: science writing radio) is helpful to the beginner as well. Sometimes hearing another writer’s struggles rather than reading them reinforces that all of us are in the same ship. Thank you again for the article.

      Have a great day.

      Sincerely,

      Mike

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        That’s a great idea! I love podcasts, though I mostly listen to motivational/personal development ones.

    • “Read up. If you aren’t one already, become a voracious reader of everything, from literary fiction to industry trade magazines.” Great advice but part of the problem. My email alone provides hours of fascinating reading. Then the day is gone.

      • Rhonda says:

        I totally agree about the email time per day I’ve just managed to lose 3 hours looking at websites through an interesting email -argh. And as I type this another interesting e.all pops up – is there a cure if you find it can you email me please lol

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        LOL, I know what you mean! In the book (the one mentioned in my bio! 🙂 I talk abot being very aggressive about reducing the amount of email you get. Now, I would never suggest unsubbing from Mary’s list because it’s awesome!…but one thing I did was unsubscribe from every email list I didn’t find super inspiring and helpful. Now I have maybe three or four left.

    • Vonnie Hill-Neyhart says:

      I woke up depressed because I have to write, but I can’t write. I opened my E-mail and an angel spoke to my heart. This article is my exact feelings towards writing right now, but lo I feel like writing again. Thanks for your cup of chamomile tea.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Wow, thank you! It’s so great to know the post inspired you on a not-so-inspired day.

    • Simon says:

      “WOW” – Your article was absolutely enriching, as well as encouraging. As an aspiring writer myself; the article gave me a shot in the arm. The practical concepts were clearly straight forward and very doable. I can sincerely say that I was truly inspired and highly motivated. Thanks for sharing.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Thanks, I’m glad you enjoyed the post! “Shot in the arm” is my aim in life! 🙂

    • SCO says:

      I am guilty of excuses #1-5 especially #5. I feel like I am at the starting line of a race. The gun goes off, and all the other runners sprint ahead with clear focus and determination. I come out of my runners stance and start walking, looking back wondering if I should even continue the race or if I should have started the race to begin with. I have even thought of becoming a freelance writer however excuses #1-5 continue to haunt me. Thanks for the article. It’s an eye-opener which will help me rethink my priorities in life.

    • Mary Kate says:

      Love all these tips, but especially “start in the middle.” I feel as though the beginning–of a novel, of a short story, of an article–is always so daunting. I love just being able to start where I want then go back and fix it later. Thank goodness for computers!

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Yes, exactly…who says you have to start at the beginning? In fact, my normal M.O. when working on a service article is to start with the tips and later work on the title and ending. Sometimes you don’t even really know what the piece is about enough to write the beginning and end — until you write the middle!

    • Guilty of all on occasion, but you are right that when you do actually sit down, motivation takes over. Thanks for inspiring me.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Glad you found the post helpful!

    • In the end, I think writing boils down to two things: self-belief and self-discipline. You can’t write without the self-belief and you won’t write without the self-discipline.

    • I work full time, have a round-trip commute time of three hours to and from the job, yet still find time to write and publish my stories. My apartment is a little bit messier than it used to be, but I’m ok (now) with only cleaning it every other day or so. My perfectionism has transferred from my surroundings to my writing, and I’m ok with the tradeoff. I’m working on a seven story collection of short stories that tie into a trilogy of horror/dystopia. It’s a juggle of time, but the writing is the most important thing in life right now. I have even put on hold the plans I had to go to law school.

      • Linda Formichelli says:

        Wow, that’s amazing! If you can do all that with such a long commute, I’d say many people’s “no time” excuses are bogus!

    • I work full time, have a round-trip commute time of three hours to and from the job, yet still find time to write and publish my stories. My apartment is a little bit messier than it used to be, but I’m ok (now) with only cleaning it every other day or so. My perfectionism has transferred from my surroundings to my writing, and I’m ok with the tradeoff. I’m working on a seven story collection of short stories that tie into a trilogy of horror/dystopia. It’s a juggle of time, but the writing is the most important thing in life right now. I have even put on hold the plans I had to go to law school.

    • I work full time, have a round-trip commute time of three hours to and from the job, yet still find time to write and publish my stories. My apartment is a little bit messier than it used to be, but I’m ok (now) with only cleaning it every other day or so. My perfectionism has transferred from my surroundings to my writing, and I’m ok with the tradeoff. I’m working on a seven story collection of short stories that tie into a trilogy of horror/dystopia. It’s a juggle of time, but the writing is the most important thing in life right now. I have even put on hold the plans I had to go to law school.

    • Stefan Lear says:

      I work full time, have a round-trip commute time of three hours to and from the job, yet still find time to write and publish my stories. My apartment is a little bit messier than it used to be, but I’m ok (now) with only cleaning it every other day or so. My perfectionism has transferred from my surroundings to my writing, and I’m ok with the tradeoff. I’m working on a seven story collection of short stories that tie into a trilogy of horror/dystopia. It’s a juggle of time, but the writing is the most important thing in life right now. I have even put on hold the plans I had to go to law school.

    • Stefan Lear says:

      I work full time, have a round-trip commute time of three hours to and from the job, yet still find time to write and publish my stories. My apartment is a little bit messier than it used to be, but I’m ok (now) with only cleaning it every other day or so. My perfectionism has transferred from my surroundings to my writing, and I’m ok with the tradeoff. I’m working on a seven story collection of short stories that tie into a trilogy of horror/dystopia. It’s a juggle of time, but the writing is the most important thing in life right now. I have even put on hold the plans I had to go to law school.

    • Hi Linda,

      This post motivated me to unleash my creativity through writing, providing mind food. As a newbie blogger, I’m struggling to sit down and write as planned before.

      When I start writing, resistance creeps into my mind. and I hate myself for this. This happens day after day.

      As this is my situation, what do I have to do to overcome it and to build concrete blogging life?

    • Chrys-Ann Ambrose says:

      Great info and advice Linda. This not only applies to writing but also to anything else you want to do in life. Looking forward to more articles from you.

    • Linda Formichelli says:

      Mary, thanks so much for having m on your blog! I look forward to seeing how others feel about this topic.

    • Anders says:

      Interesting! I did a similar post on my blog. Is primarily about which yoga type you are and what yoga you should practice Many tips and more if you are interested!


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