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    50 Ways to Woo Readers to Your Blog (And Make Them Stay)

    woo your readers - web

    When it comes to writing for the web, you are only as good as your last word. First impressions are made on the www much faster than the 30 seconds you have to impress someone in person. You have one chance to grab someone’s attention, so you better make it good. Attracting a readership organically and authentically, will always win over some yucky, spammy, get rich quick, scheme or scam. Attracting the right reader, in the right way, will ensure a devoted audience for life.

    What happened to the way you used to woo? If you are in a relationship, and treat your partner the way you did when you first started dating, you might have more fun and certainly, your lover will feel inspired to return the favor. This behavior will encourage a long-term, perhaps life long relationship. Similarly, you want to woo your readers and internet relationships in the honeymoon phase, all the way through your first e-book, and ongoing. When you stop wooing, you start taking things too seriously, nitpicking and not enjoying the process. When you stop nurturing the relationship with joy and love, it will reflect in your bed and your blog!

    50 ways to woo the web world.

    (you may be able to apply a few of these to your love life as well!)

    15 ways to woo with your blog:

    1. Your blog is the heart and soul of the connection you have with your readers. Treat it that way.
    2. Write about what you love, not about what is popular.
    3. Write for your readers, not for search engines.
    4. Dress up. Make your blog space a visually appealing place to be.
    5. Don’t send mixed signals. Make sure your website is easy to navigate.
    6. Ask your readers what they want, and give it to them.
    7. Be responsive. When someone takes the time to comment on your blog, reply.
    8. Borrow, but don’t steal.
    9. Be curious. Be inquisitive and explore, and sparks will fly.
    10. Be attentive. Check your grammar and spelling.
    11. Keep your word. Be who you say you are.
    12. Focus on the important. Do more writing than stat checking.
    13. Be faithful. Stay on topic.
    14. Don’t be shy, but remember that whatever you put “out there”, will be “out there” forever. (or a really long time).
    15. Say thank you. Appreciate that someone cares about what you say, and make it worth reading.

    10 ways to woo with guest posting:

    1. Put your best foot forward. You might think about saving your best posts for your own blog. Instead, make each post your best, regardless of where it shows up.
    2. Research the site where you would like to post to see if there are specific directions for guest posting. (and follow them)
    3. Get to know the writer and their blog before you send your pitch.
    4. Don’t assume you know their audience. Ask questions.
    5. Be Considerate. Make your pitch short and sweet, but polite and personal.
    6. Ask for input and recommendations. Make changes accordingly and graciously.
    7. Respond to comments on the guest post.
    8. Do not include your own affiliate links, but suggest that the blogger can include their own.
    9. Promote the guest post to your audience and help drive traffic.
    10. Say thank you. After your post goes up, send a thank you note and express interest in future collaboration.

     

    7 ways to woo with affiliate sales:

    1. Sell products you believe in. If you are selling shit, your readers will know it, and they will tell their friends.
    2. Only recommend something that has entertained, informed or inspired you.
    3. Recommend products that fit the theme of your blog.
    4. Stand by your money back guarantee if you have one.
    5. Encourage feedback from readers about the products you sell.
    6. Don’t make someone say yes or no to a product before they can read your blog, even if it’s free.
    7. Say thank you. When the buyer feels appreciated, they will buy from you again.

     

    4 ways to woo when commenting on other blogs:

    1. Do not include links to your blog when you leave a comment.
    2. If you don’t have something relevant to say, don’t say anything at all.
    3. Disagree, but do it with respect to the writer and other readers.
    4. Comment thoughtfully. Avoid generic comments like “Great Post” or “Thanks for the info”.

     

    13 ways to woo with social media:

    1. Do not underestimate the responsibility and power of the opportunity to build your audience.
    2. Offer compelling, interesting, useful information.
    3. Network, but keep your readers in mind.
    4. Be yourself. If you aren’t funny in person, you aren’t funny in 140 characters or less.
    5. Don’t follow to get a follower.
    6. If you can’t be everywhere well, don’t be. Choose one or two platforms and make them work for you.
    7. This is not your personal diary.
    8. Ask questions.
    9. Start conversations.
    10. Engage in conversations.
    11. Say enough, but not too much. When you start losing your audience, your saying too much.
    12. Only follow the number of people you can keep up with.
    13. Say thank you. Show your appreciation when others retweet your info or share on Facebook.

    1 more way to woo:

    Last but not least, take care of you. When you eat well, exercise and feed your interests, you can be more generous and loving with your partner. To keep energized and fit to woo the web world, read and write just for you. Keep a personal journal where you can write whatever you want. It might not be your best work in terms of appealing to an audience, but it will be meaningful to you. As you are cleverly crafting great stories to share with the world, you still need a personal outlet. Some of the things you write for yourself may turn into blog entries, guest posts or even a novel, but some of it will just be for you.

    How do you woo the web world?

    About the author

      Courtney Carver

      Courtney is a writer and fine art photographer. She writes about simplifying and living life on purpose at bemorewithless.com.

    • Shane says:

      There are some really interesting and true points in this post!!! definitely bookmarking for future reference!!

      Thanks Courtney!!

    • harly says:

      Nice blog i think you express one thing that is love what you do and done it from bottom of your heart. Its is pleasureful for you and your readers.Thanks for the nice blog.

      • Thanks Harly, That is a great way to put it. If you enjoy what you writing, your readers will more than likely enjoy it too!

    • Interesting and useful post 🙂

    • Hey Courtney — I guess I woo the web with honesty and spontaneity…I don’t plan out everything word for word, but I do what you wrote here so cleverly in romantic metaphors, and I guess that builds a solid relationship!

    • I really loved the last part about nurturing yourself and your inner artist. Wooing the web world is something I struggle with, so I appreciate all the advice I can get!

      • Courtney says:

        Ashley, As much as we think we can be a different person online, I think that if you are not an outgoing, networker in real life, it will be challenging to have it come naturally in the web world. Many artists really struggle with this, so you are not alone!

        I recommend baby steps – pick one or two things to focus on and do them over and over again for a couple of weeks. Before you know it, you will be wooing the www!

    • Anita says:

      I was laughing to myself as I read your article, especially about writing for yourself, not for the search engines…I have been trying to get more traffic…listening to those guys out there telling us how to get your site top ranked, etc. by using keywords and phrases that rank high…even writing a couple of posts based on a high ranking google phrase….Well, it didn’t seem to help me too much…so I guess I’ll just go on plugging away. I like your articles though and will keep reading. Thanks!

      • Anita, It’s easy to get caught up in the hype, but like most things in life, slow and steady….

    • Betty says:

      Thank you for the excellent suggestions! It really helps to see them organized and written down. I’ve just found an excellent reference book called “The Thinker’s Thesaurus: Sophisticated Alternatives to Common Words” by author Peter E. Meltzer. This book gives sophisticated and interesting synonyms. It’s also a great vocabulary enhancement tool! It has become an integral writing tool for me!

    • RORY says:

      I was going to say ‘great post’ but it seems like that just don’t cut it anymore! I’m only joking, you’ve made some very good points here Courtney. ‘Make your blog space a visually appealing place to be’ is I feel very important. I’m a web designer and find that design blogs are usually visually superb but when I read SEO blogs they look as dull as dishwater. Which is a shame as they tend to have more useful posts on.

    • Farnoosh, Thank you! Another great reason why, if we are blogging, we need to write about something that we really care about. If are just writing what we think everyone else wants to hear, eventually, it will become a chore.

      Glad you are taking such good care of yourself!

      Thanks!
      Courtney

    • Farnoosh says:

      Now this was an authentic and extremely well written series of advice, thank you dear Courtney! I am thrilled that I am doing most of these – yes yes!! – I always told myself if the blog becomes a chore then I have no reason to continue – and it would if we do what we think we are supposed to do. Granted, we need to show our work due diligence but we do not need to become robots. Thank you also for the final tip which is the core of my happiness; taking good care of myself and eating extremely well!!!!

    • I woo the internet with my enthusiasm. I’m in love with my blog, readers and what I have to say. I love what I do, quite simply. Yes!

      • Courtney says:

        Gerlaine, Enthusiasm should definitely be added to the list. So now we have 51 Ways to Woo the Web World! Glad you love what you do!

    • Loved the post. Very usefull stuff.

    • Issa says:

      You’ve got a nice list there, thanks. I believe that when it comes to writing, you must do it from the heart. Your readers will definitely know you’re for real – just by the way you write your stuff. Sometimes, people can forget these things as they are bombarded with stats from Google PR, adwords and the likes. It’s all about quality these days.. and those people who think they can get away with keyword stuffing and link farms are more likely to fail.

      • Issa, Perhaps when you write for Google instead of your readers, you grow quickly, but I think you fail fast as well. The only people that are going to stick around are the ones who love what you write and take something away from it.

    • I just loved your list on how to woo with a blog. It made me realize that I strive to do all those things, but I never realized it. Seeing it listed out here was great as it gave me some reassurance that I’m doing the right thing.

      Also, took a look at your blog, loved it and subscribed. Looking forward to reading more from you.

      -Moki

      • Thanks Moki! I look forward to hearing more from you. Congrats on doing the right thing!!

    • LNicole says:

      Hi Courtney- your post has words to live by. To be your best you must live a true and honest life.

      The timing of this post is perfect, as I’m trying to evolve my writing style and increase my creativity. After reading this I feel that I shouldn’t push too much to change what I already have going for me.

      p.s I’m looking forward in discovering “be more with less” – what a great concept.

      • I agree. Your best bet is to be genuine and true to who you are. Your writing style may change over time and I think that is ok too!

    • Cristina says:

      Nice post, your tips are informative and helpful; I only disagree, in part, with this statement:
      “Comment thoughtfully. Avoid generic comments like “Great Post” or “Thanks for the info”.”
      Although I believe that comments should be thoughtful, and add something to the blogging experience, sometimes time is short…
      If I’m in a rush but I’ve read a particularly good post, I can sometimes write something like “Great article, thank you for sharing!”, or “This really resonated with me, thank you!” because I want to give something back to the writer – even if it’s just a thank you 🙂

      • Really good point Cristina! In fact, I have felt the same way, and done the same thing. I brought that point up, more for bloggers that sometimes work their way through hundreds of posts, and drop a two line comment to get their name out there. I think they think that they will find success with their quantity of comments, instead of the quality of their comments.

    • Stephen says:

      Simple, practical and very helpful.

      Thank you,
      Stephen.

      • Thanks Stephen. I used to think “simple” meant I wasn’t expressive enough, but now it is one of my favorite compliments! 😉

    • Michelle Sieger says:

      THANKS for the excellent post, very detailed and helpful. Every point you bring up is very precious.

      (OK, fine, so I Won’t leave a link to my site. !!! )

      • Courtney says:

        Michelle, I appreciate the great feedback. Thanks for not leaving a link! 😉

    • Nice post, Courtney. You’re doing something right since I see your name everywhere — including among my own blog’s commenters.

      Write well and say something good. That the trick to an increasingly successful blog like yours — and mine, too.

      Gip

      • Courtney says:

        Gip, The beauty of it is that we can write something useful, and have fun at the same time. Thanks for commenting!

    • Tracey says:

      Courtney-

      When I started blogging a few months ago I began to dive, dig and devour information on how to improve without giving up on why I started or giving into all the tips and tricks.

      Your post is a wonderful compilation on what to do, how to stay true, improve and inspire.

      Thanks for taking the time to write and share. It’s wonderful.

      • Courtney says:

        Thanks Tracey, I hope there are suggestions you can put to use. I had fun writing it!

    • meg says:

      Great post, Courtney–deft blend of soft framework (wooing) with hard content (lists). I learned from both what you wrote and how you wrote it, so thank you very much 🙂

      • Thanks Meg! You have a way with words yourself. Thanks for the a great compliment.

    • Kay,

      I’m glad you found value in the blog post and the blog itself. Writetodone.com has been such a source of inspiration for me. I’m so glad I got an opportunity to post here!

      Thanks!
      Courtney

    • Kay says:

      I’m currently taking an on-line writing class through WOW-Women On Writing. One of our assignments was to find blogs we liked and add them to our Google Reader. I don’t remember exactly how I found “Write to Done” but I added it to my reader last week. It’s a keeper! This is a concise and creative post and I just sent the it via e-mail to my online blogging instructor. Thank you for your insights. Kay

    • Hi Courtney,
      This statement is so true: When you stop wooing, you start taking things too seriously, nitpicking and not enjoying the process.

      When blogging becomes the art of discovery, I enjoy every minute. When I spend too much time wondering what will be tweeted or what sets me apart, I end up cranky.

      Thanks for these tips. I’m going to put them into practice today!
      Melissa

      • Melissa,

        Glad I can help keep you un-cranky! I think most of blog because we love writing and love what we write about. It’s so important to love the process because that comes through in what we present to readers.

        Thanks for your comment!
        Courtney

    • I’m always on the lookout for tips, and yours are very specific. I like that. And I’m looking forward to reading your blog. The name alone, Be More With Less, appeals to me. I’m all about “simplifying and living life on purpose.” We all need to be more concerned about being more than having more.


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